Andre Guillet, Combat Controller M.I.A., Click Here

This Gallery Is To Inform You Of The Most Recent Passing Of  Those Within Our Brotherhood, I'm So Sorry!



Oh! How tall these airmen stand
Molded of the finest clay
They pledge their honor and their code
These men in the Scarlet Red Beret

Oh! Knights, Oh! Warriors clad in blue
Lancelot's of modern day
The best our country has to give,
These men in the Scarlet Red Beret

Their battlefields have known no bounds
They lead the brave and show the way
Their courage beacons beams of light
These men in the Scarlet Red Beret

A wave of pride comes over me
A pride that I can't stem nor stay
Humbled just to be among
These men in the Scarlet Red Beret

Unfurl the flag and roll the drums
The buglers must have their anthem play
To honor those who've gone before
These men in the Scarlet Red Beret

To those who've made that final jump
We salute and this we pray
Their memories will never fade
These men in the Scarlet Red Beret

                                         By Major John Lewis, USAF, Ret.
                                 Combat Control Officer
Reflections of a Fallen
Combat Controller



I was that which others did not strive to be.

I went where others feared to go'
I did what others failed to do.

I asked nothing from those who gave nothing,
And reluctantly accepted the thought of eternal loneliness
Should I fail.

I have seen the face of terror
Felt the stinging cold of fear;
And enjoyed the sweet taste
Of a moment's love

I have cried, pained, and hoped;
But most of all,
I have lived times others would say
were best forgotten.

And now,
As I take my final rest,
I am able to boast
That I am proud of what I was:

An Air Force Combat Controller


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We lost Wayne Gardner last evening 17 Apr 2014
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (WHNT) – A single vehicle wreck on Ledges Drive claimed a man’s life Thursday night.  Huntsville Police say Wayne Carter Gardner, 66, was driving down Ledges Drive just before 8:30 p.m. and lost control of his vehicle.  Gardner was driving a black Audi, and it left the road on the right side and hit a gas lamp post.  Gardner was the only person in the vehicle and died on the scene.  Gardner also founded and co-owned T&W Operations, a defense contracting company based in Huntsville.  Gardner was born in Alabama and leaves behind a wife, two children and three grandchildren.
  
Wayne Gardner was killed in a one car auto accident yesterday evening outside of Huntsville, AL. He was a life long friend of mine in as well as a friend to you. The description of the accident seems like he had a heart issue and ran off the road. See http://whnt.com/2014/04/17/crash-on-ledges-drive-claims-mans-life/ 
The service is taking place on Monday so I'm off Sunday, returning Tues morning. The timing is tough due to Easter but Col Buck, Charlie McCarthy, Jack King, Doc Kadlec, and myself will be there. I'm sure Bob Blowers and all of Wayne's T&W employees will be there. JK

John Koren
Hm / Work 817-358-0847
Cell 817-521-2925


Wayne Carter Gardner, 66, of Huntsville, passed away Thursday.  Mr. Gardner was a graduate of Marbury High School and Troy State University.  He received his MBA from Golden State University.  Mr. Gardner was a 25 year veteran of the US Air Force and he was a partner of T & W Operations in Huntsville. Survivors include his wife, Bonnie Lee Purcell Gardner; two sons, Jeffrey Wayne Gardner and Christopher James Gardner; two sisters, Glenda Ann Monte and Brenda Sue Quinn; and three grandchildren: Zoe Lain Gardner, Cora Luna Gardner, and Peyton Elizabeth Gardner.

Visitation will be Monday from 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. at Berryhill Funeral Home followed by a 1:00 chapel service.  Burial will be at Maple Hill Cemetery.  In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Special Operations Warrior Foundation (www.specialops.org).  
 
From Chuck Trimple; I regret to inform you and offer further details concerning the untimely death of Wayne Carter Gardner, Major (Retired) who deceased on the evening of 04.17.14 as the result of an automobile accident at the age of 66. He resided at: 373 W.T. Garrison Ln NW; Huntsville, AL 35810-6122; (256) 858-9987.

He is survived by his wife Bonnie Lee Purcell Gardner; two sons: Jeffery & Christopher; two sisters: Glenda Monte & Brenda Quinn, and three grandchildren: Zoe Gardner, Cora Gardner and Elizabeth Gardner.

Visitation will be on April 21 from 1100 – 1300 at Berryhill Funeral Home: 2305 Memorial Parkway NW; Huntsville, AL. (256) 536-9197. Burial will follow the funeral service at the Maple Hill Cemetery. A military Honor Guard has been requested. Donations should be made to the Special Operations Warrior Foundation.

He graduated from CCS in Class 73-5. Some of his Combat Control assignments were at Hurlburt, Pope and McChord; however he was stationed at many other locations as a non-CCTer.

He was Life Member 068 of the CCA. He was also a member of the American Legion and the Air Commando Association.

May he Rest in Peace, CT



John Koren, Charlie McCarthy, Bob Blowers, Jack King, John Buck, and Chuck Trimple

Wayne died in a one car auto wreck on Thursday April 17; and his funeral service was held on Monday April 21 in Huntsville, AL at the Berryhill Funeral Home. Visitation started at 1100 and the funeral service began at 1300.  T&W employees, local Huntsville friends and family members all attended. Tom Jarrell, co-founder with Wayne of T&W Operations, organized the event in a most professional manner. Tom is close to Bonnie and Wayne's sons, Jeff and Chris, so all family planning items were in good hands. CCT veterans attending the service were: Col John Buck, Jack King, Charlie McCarthy, John Koren, Buddy Bowden, J.D. Burch, Billie Slayton, Chuck Trimple, Geoff Hitchcock, and Bob Blowers. Along with Tom Jarrell and some family members, I was honored to eulogize Wayne while representing all of our AF veterans, and the SOWF. After the service we proceeded to the Maple Hill Cemetery on a brilliant day with beautiful flowering trees throughout. The AF provided three members of a burial detail including the bugler; and the local AmVets provided the firing squad. All did perfectly well and the bugler was flawless. Tom Jarrell said a few words of prayer. One of Wayne's local buddies, a former Marine, then passed out plastic shot cups and we toasted Wayne with his favorite Kentucky bourbon, Makers Mark. T&W hosted some of us at a late lunch in Huntsville; and later on Col Buck, Jack, Charlie, and myself attended the AA Huntsville Stars in the T&W corporate box. Food was courtesy of the Stars' staff in honor of Wayne. It was sad to let Wayne go but the day was characterized with great honor and dignity for our fallen brother and great American.
JK

John Koren
Hm / Work 817-358-0847
Cell 817-521-2925




Morton J. “Mort” Freedman
I’m sad to inform you that Morton J. “Mort” Freedman (CMSgt, Retired) deceased on March 27th, 2014 at 10:00PM at a hospital in Cagayan De Oro, Philippines.  He is survived by his loving wife Nina.

Mort’s funeral will be in the Barangay near his house about 15 miles from Cagayan De Oro. The dates will be determined later today, but I suspect visitation will start tomorrow for 3 – 4 days.

If you would like to send flowers for Mort, you can mail a check to: James Bird; 2372 Happy Lane; Oak Harbor, WA 98227. A small stand of flowers costs about $25, and a Medium to Large stand costs $60. Mark the check as flowers for Mort. Send an email to  jc.margarita@gmail.com when you send the check, and “JC” will front the money so that by Monday morning the flowers are in the funeral home outside Cagayan De Oro.

As a young man during the 1950’s Mort worked for a circus. He joined the Air Force in 1963, and became a parachute rigger in the Parachute Shop at Hurlburt. He was a member of the 1963 Air Commando Parachute Team. After competing in the 1965 U.S. Parachuting Nationals, he and three others went TDY to the Air Force Academy as instructors. He then cross- trained into Combat Control after a second assignment at the AFA. He was part of a CCT element in the rescue operation at Kham Duc, RVN on May 12, 1968 where he and his fellow team mate were awarded the Silver Star for their actions. His subsequent assignments were Clark AB, Norton AFB until his military retirement back again at Clark AB.

 Mort was a Combat Control Association Life Member 227.
 Rest in Peace My Friend,  Chuck Trimple



Robert C. "Bob" Triplett
I regret to inform you of the death of Robert C. Triplett who deceased on January 4, 2014. The funeral with military honors has already taken place. He was living at Las Cruces, NM at the time of his demise. Bob graduated from the Combat Control School in Class 65-4 while he was stationed at Dover. His subsequent CCT assignments included Tan Son Nhut, VN and Pope. He retired from the Air Force during 1983. Additional details shall be listed at the CCT Memorial Website as they become available.

Rest in Peace, Chuck Trimple

CT
Bob and I were stationed together at CCK along with Larry Watkins, Dick West, Jere Glass, Dick Heins, Adon Gutiérrez, Dick Brawley, and John Karr.  We worked the Tan Son Nhut mission, as well as several great vacation spots in Thailand.  He was always mission oriented, practical minded, and concerned with the well-fare of his teammates.  I remember Bob as a good – hearted, thinking man and a loyal teammate…   I guess I had looked for him in all the wrong places.. I would like to have had the opportunity to visit with him again. .. Barry Gayles





James B. McElvian, TSgt, USAF (Ret)      CCA#0001

I regret to inform you of the untimely death of James B. McElvian, TSgt, USAF (Ret) of 5 Sandal Wood Dr, Apt 15A; Fort Walton Beach, FL 32548-4557 who deceased on Friday, January 10, 2014 at the age of 84. The cause of death was throat cancer and respiratory failure.

He is survived by a dedicated son James H. McElvian, and loving daughters: Brenda Pratt, Teresa Dozier and Mary McElvain.

He was one of the founding members of the Combat Control Teams during January, 1953. He was stationed at Donaldson AFB, Lawson AAF, Sewart AFB, Evereux AB FR, Pope AFB (2x); Ton Son Nhut AB, Vietnam; Mildenhall AB, England and retired from the Combat Control Team at Dyess AFB, TX. These bases are not necessarily in order.

He was always a great supporter of the Combat Control Association and its first Life Member number 001. He was also a Life Member of the VFW.

May he Rest in Peace, Chuck Trimple

Tech Sgt. James B. "Mac" McElvian, USAF (CCT), retired, age 84, of Fort Walton Beach, Fla., passed away Friday, Jan. 10, 2014. He was born in Altha, Fla., to Graves Howell McElvian and Olga Hansford McElvian on March 23, 1929. He has been a resident of Fort Walton Beach since his retirement from the United States Air Force in 1971.

Mac was a Vietnam veteran, a life member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, VFW Post 7674, and "Life Member #1" of the Combat Control Association.

Mac holds a place in the annals of USAF history as a member of the very first Combat Control Team formed in 1953. His family is most proud of him and his service to this great country.

Mac is preceded in death by his loving wife Margie E. McElvian.   He is survived by three daughters and one son; Mary M. McElvian, Teresa A. Dozier (Richard), Brenda L. Pratt (Hal Blanton), and James H. McElvian (Gloria); five grandchildren, Alex D. Alvarez, Angie Coleman Rao, Mark A. Roberts, Ryan H. Dozier, and Shannon L. Pratt; and five great-grandchildren; Yanasa T. Alvarez, Krishna Rao, Anna V. Dozier, Elijah J. Dozier, and Austin L. Pratt.

The family also wishes to thank Mrs. Joan Young and Mrs. Brenda Guthrie for their kindness and friendship to our father over the years.

A public graveside service will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014, at 11:30 a.m. at Beal Memorial Cemetery in Fort Walton Beach.

Arrangements and services are under the direction of the Emerald Coast Funeral Home. Expressions of love and sympathy may be viewed online at www.emeraldcoastfuneralhome.com.





Joel “Joe” C. Mahurin

I regret to inform you of the death of Joel “Joe” C. Mahurin, TSgt (Ret) who deceased of lung cancer on October 18, 2013 at the age of 73. He is survived by a son, two daughters and two grand daughters. He graduated from Combat Control School in Class 71-2 with subsequent CCT assignments at Forbes and Littlerock. He worked for the Post Office after his military retirement.

May he Rest in Peace, Chuck Trimple





           ERIC WEBSTER, LITTLE ROCK CCT, REST IN PEACE BROTHER!
From Greg Peterson; It is with deepest regrets that I inform you of the death of Eric Webster, age 53.  Eric died at home this morning about 0500hrs, 12-18-2013. For now the funeral is tentatively planned for Monday, 23 December. Arrangements are being made with Minnesota Valley Funeral Home in New Ulm.  Eric graduated from the Combat Control School in Class 84-3, and served most of his time on the Combat Control Team at Littlerock, AR.

Please send your condolence cards to:


Eric Webster Family
53447 350th Street
Lafayette, MN 56054
pictured are Bob Overland, Eric, and Greg Peterson

LAFAYETTE - Eric Webster, 53, of Lafayette died Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2013 at his home following a long battle with Multiple Sclerosis.

Funeral service will be 11 a.m. Monday, Dec. 23, 2013 at the Bernadotte Lutheran Church in Bernadotte. Burial will be in the church cemetery with full military honors being conducted by the Lafayette American Legion Post #300 and United States Air Force Honor Guard.

Visitation will be 3-7 p.m. Sunday and 7:30-8 a.m. Monday at the Minnesota Valley Funeral Home, NORTH CHAPEL in New Ulm and will continue for one hour prior to the time of service at the church on Monday. A complete obituary will appear in the Saturday edition of The Journal.

Eric is survived by his mother, Sally Webster of Lafayette; daughters and sons-in-law, Lindsay and Matt Koolmo of North Branch, Jessica and James Henderson of New Ulm; son, Elias Webster of Lafayette; grandchildren, Kodie and Dillon Koolmo, Tevin, Douglas and Alan Henderson; sisters and brothers-in-law, Beth and Eric Nelson of St. Paul, Heidi and Tom Bramley of Burnsville; brother and sister-in-law, David and Pam Webster of Shakopee; aunts; uncles, nieces; nephews; and cousins. He was preceded in death by his father Douglas Webster; and a brother, Paul Webster.

Eric Charles Webster was born on Dec. 8, 1960 in Gaylord to Douglas and Sally (Mueller) Webster. He graduated from the Winthrop High School. Eric served in the United States Air Force for eight years until retiring due to his health. He attended and graduated from Mankato State College in Mankato with a B.S. degree in Business. Eric enjoyed participating in the National Veteran's Wheelchair games, being a Scout Master, and working on classic cars. He was a member of the Bernadotte Lutheran Church where he was a past board member and Sunday school teacher, a member of the American Legion Post # 300 in Lafayette, D.A.V. He also was a former GFW school board member and had been a board member of the Paralyzed Veterans of America.



We were honored to have three former CCT team members as Pall Bearers: Bob Jeffers, Hector Jones, and David Schnoor.  Thank you so much for passing along the red beret and then getting the CCT flash to us prior to the funeral.  I got a lot of hugs from all of Eric's family, but the hugs need to be sent back to you and your fine team of operators.
 
We will, of course never forget Eric or his funeral; but Minnesota's cruel weather will also be remembered in conjunction with the funeral.  The static temp was -14 degrees with a skin slicing wind chill of -33 degrees. 
 
Many of the civilians coughed, shivered, and silently complained while the absolute stellar USAF Honor Guard, CCT silent warriors, American Legion and Patriot Guard remained resilient and outwardly unaffected by the cold.  To our surprise the USAF Honor Guard, from Grand Forks AFB was wearing short sleeved shirts under their dress uniforms!
 
I thought that I'd be really "torn up" at the wake and funeral, and a few tears did flow.  But I knew that Eric went through so much, and also gave so much, that now he was finally in peace. 
 
Greg Peterson
Director of Veterans Services
Brown County, Minnesota




John C. VanLund. Abilene and Louisiana 65-69. Died Aug 2001
Lonnie Stewart reports
John Carl Van Lund 1945 - 2001 was born on July 07, 1945.  John died on August 14, 2001 at 56 years old.   Burial / FuneralMiddle Tennessee State Veterans Cemetery, Section PP Row 13 Site 41, 7931 McCrory Lane, Nashville, Tn 37221

From Chuck Trimple; John graduated from Lackland on 05-04-65, CCS Class 67-2, and listed on a CCT Recall Roster at Dyess dated 1966.

From Jimmy Parsons; I went through Jump School with a Van Lund Class 38, 1965 … After ATC school he was headed for Dyess AFB CCT.

From Gary Brock; Picture left is VanLund taken at Dyess around '65 or '66.   Daryl Prudden, Sherman Miller, VanLund (in jeep) and Craig Clark.  Went thru CCS at Sewart in 1967 where he met his wife, Judy.  I believe he transferred to the tower around 1967. 

From Lonnie Stewart;I was stationed with john in act school and Dyess until late 1966. Then remained friends in contact until his death. Very cool guy.   Pictured below is Lonnie with John and more of John................





Lundy Cleveland Hudgin, age 85 of Clarksville, TN,
 died Saturday, November 23, 2013, at his home.
Lundy Cleveland Hudgin, age 85 of Clarksville, TN, died Saturday, November 23, 2013, at his home.

Lundy was born in Whitakers, NC, to the late Franklin C. Hudgin and Lucile Vivian Gibson. He was also preceded in death by his wife, Opal Hazel Hudgin; one son, Mike Hudgin; one brother, Ray Hudgin; four half-brothers; and one half-sister.

Lundy served in the U.S. Army from 1947-1953. He was a member of the 101st Airborne Division and U.S. Army Special Forces with his highest rank being SSGT. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1955-1975 as a Combat Air Controller with his highest rank being SMSGT. He served one tour of duty in Vietnam from 1967-1968.

Lundy is survived by one son, Tim (Lisa) Hudgin, of Michigan; one daughter, Joy (Greg) Hutchison, of Woodlawn, TN; two brothers, Herman Hudgin and Frank Hudgin; three sisters, Modolen Hollis, Via Pierce, Francis Burke; six grandchildren, Kevin Hutchison, Stacy Outland, Branden Davis, Holden Hudgin, Sally Hudgin, Molly Hudgin; and two great grandchildren.

Pictured above; Larry Moose" Morris, Lundy and Opal Hudgin.

There's a Plan for Your Life

One thing my Dad let us know is that he believed that each person had an appointed time on this earth, a plan that we don't always understand. His conviction was that everyone's life has a plan and that you have to persist and never give up. He often told us that when your life on this earth ended, it was your appointed time. So, Dad, this was your time, and we are thankful for what you have given us. We miss you already.

Lundy Cleveland Hudgin was born to a poor but large and loving family with lots of brothers and sisters. He left home after graduating from high school and joked that when he left they broke his plate so he did not return. But the truth is that he left home out of a strong sense of responsibility and self-reliance, not because he was not loved.

Lundy joined the Army Paratroopers, and then the Special Forces, that only a select group of people qualify for. He didn't do this to prove how tough he was, but as a way to better himself. He was resourceful and could see that the Special Forces was a new group with an opportunity to advance. He was right, after 6 years he earned the rank of Staff Sargent.

Being in the Special Forces was not a matter of luck. The training is difficult and designed to make people quit. Dad always said, never give up. His role on his Special Forces team was Medic, and so he was trained to take quick action in bloody, gorey situations. He knew how to start an IV, stitch up wounds, and take care of massive wounds.

During that time Dad met his true love, Opal, the love of his life. Opal was a hairdresser and so Lundy left the Army and learned to barber so they could start their new lives together. He supported her dreams and she started her own business and they had crazy adventures together.

Later Lundy decided to go back into the Army, but they would only take him as an E1, a Private. Lundy looked at the Air Force and because of his training in Special Forces and as a Paratrooper, the Air Force wanted him as a Combat Air Controller and he entered as an E3.

One of the unique jobs Dad had in the Air Force as part of a Parachute Demonstration Team. I'm not surprised if you never knew this about Lundy, because he didn't jump out of planes for bragging rights or for thrills. Not long ago when Lundy's great grandson, Joey, watched parachutes opening in the skies behind his house, he told Lundy that he wanted to parachute too. Lundy's advice was “Make sure you get paid for it!” Dad did this as a means to provide for his family.

Lundy became an accomplished Combat Air Controller in the Air Force and served our country in Vietnam in 1968. His job brought him close to the fighting and he saw horrible things, but he endured and did not dwell on that time in Vietnam. He said he did what he was snet to do, and then he moved on.

Dad finished his career in the Air Force at Fort Campbell, and then tested for the position of letter carrier with the Post Office so that he continued to take care of his family. Dad's military experiences influenced both me and my brother, Mike, to go into the service in the Navy and the Army. I don't know exactly what he did, but I know my Dad used all his resources to help his kids as they started their own lives. He looked after us long after we left the nest, but didn't tell us what we should or shouldn't do. I think Dad's life reflected a verse from 1 Thessalonians 4:11 in the bible: “Make it your business to live a quiet life, minding your own business and working with your hands.”

One of the toughest things my Dad and Mom endured was the early death of my brother, Mike. They pressed on and had a beautiful relationship with Mike's family, especially with his son, Holden. Dad and Mom were terrific grandparents, and taught us from example how to take care of and love each other.

Of all Lundy's accomplishments, the most amazing part of his life was how he was so perfectly prepared to care for my mom. Dad was trained, resourceful, committed, and deeply in love. Dad was 10 years younger than mom, which was unusual for most couples. He was in his seventies and took care of mom's every need during her illness with Alzheimer's. All of things in his life; the challenges of military training, being a medic in Special Forces, enduring the hardships of war, had prepared dad for his most important mission; to take special care of mom. He never complained, he never gave up, and he did his job.

There is a verse in the bible in Jeremiah 29:11 that I think describes Lundy's beliefs.

“For I know the plans I have to you, declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you. Plans to give you hope and a future.”


Arrangements entrusted to Neal-Tarpley-Parchman Funeral Home, 1510 Madison Street, Clarksville, TN 37040; (931) 645-6488. Online condolences may be made at www.neal-tarpley.com.




Donald M. Carlyle, MSgt Retired, CCS Class 65-3 while stationed at Sewart

Donald M. Carlyle, 74, of Gilbert, Arizona passed away on August 7, 2013. Born in Ferndale, Michigan to Marvin and Helen (Holmquist) Carlyle, Donald arrived on May 23, 1939 and was the oldest of four children.
Donald was retired from the United States Air Force where he earned the rank of Master Sergeant. He had a distinguished career in the Air Force and received many awards; including a Bronze Star Medal with V-Device and one Oak Leaf Cluster, an Air Medal with ten Oak Leaf Clusters, the Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with one Oak Leaf Cluster, a Combat Readiness Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, an Air Force Good Conduct Medal with five Oak Leaf Clusters, the National Defense Service Medal, an Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Vietnam Service Medal with four Bronze Service Stars, and the Air Force Longevity Service Award Ribbon with four Oak Leaf Clusters. He was an Air Commando Combat Controller; a FFA certified Air Traffic Controller; he attended numerous Special Operations Schools, Parachute courses, Survival Training courses, and Instructor Training courses.

During his younger years, Donald was a member of the Masons (32nd Degree). In his free time, he enjoyed fishing and motorcycle riding. Donald married Carol on November 6, 1992. Together they shared a love for horses and Donald eventually went on to show their horses.

Donald is survived by his wife of 20 years, Carol; children, James Carlyle (Sabrina), Diana Carlyle (Ken Pedalino), Richard Carlyle (Melinda), and Cathryn Carlyle; siblings, Richard Carlyle (Glenna), Shirley Boss, and Gary Carlyle (Stella); 11 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren. He is preceded in death by his parents, Marvin Carlyle and Helen Carlyle and brother in law, Tom Boss.



Wayne L. Barnett, also known as Bandido Barnett, of Killeen, passed away July 16, 2013.

He was born on July 12, 1942 to D. C. and Violet Barnett in Waco, TX.

Wayne graduated from University High School in 1961, and immediately joined the Air Force. He proudly served for 20 years, before retiring. He was awarded a Bronze Star in part for his service in Vietnam.

He was preceded in death by his father and grandparents.

Wayne is survived by his mother, Violet Barnett; his loving wife, Charity Barnett; children Michael Barnett (Vanessa) and John Barnett (Delana); four grandchildren; and sisters Betty Blain and Darlene Hardy(Gary).

Funeral Services will be held at 11AM on Wednesday, July 24, 2013 at Heritage Funeral Home, Harker Heights. Interment will follow at Central Texas State Veterans Cemetery. A visitation will be held prior to the service from 9AM to 11AM.

Services have been entrusted to Heritage Funeral Home.

Wayne's CCT History 67-68 Vietnam, 68-71 1st Sow CCT England AFB La., 72-74 3rd Aerial Port  Sqd. POPE AFB NC,. Being a P-304 he also had some DAS/TAS (Direct Air Support/Tactical Air Support ) prior to Vietnam and a short stint at Ft Bragg before Pope. He left Pope via Palace Chase for  avionics on the New F111’s in mid-late 74.



Joe Don Willard, SMSgt, USAF, Ret.

I regret to inform you of the untimely death of Joe Don Willard, SMSgt, USAF, Ret. on April 6, 2013 at the age of 82 as the result of a accidental fall.

Joe was born in Highpoint, NC to the late Charles E. and Ila Mae Jackson Willard. He was a retired Director of Quantico National Cemetery starting the upon its opening in 1983, veteran of the US Army and retired veteran of Combat Contol, and of the Baptist faith.

He was preceded in death by his parents; brother, Charles Willard Jr.; sister Dorthy Ray Hornady. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn Willard; sons Joe D. Willard Jr., of McMinnville and Mitchell Vance (Lesa) Willard of Murfreesboro; daughters, Cindy M. (Leroy) Groves of Murfreesboro, Debbie Kay (Jack) Sinkey of Cabot, AR, Josie Willard of Murfreesboro and Jess Willard (Clayton) Grayum of Murfreesboro; nine grandchildren; six great Grandchildren.

Joe was one of the first few Combat Controllers to attain the rank of Senior Master Sergeant during the late 1960’s while he was stationed at Travis AFB, CA. His first Combat Control assignment was at Sewart AFB, TN sometime between 1957-1962.

Joe was one of the finest Combat Controller that I have ever had the privilege of serving with.

Rest in Peace, Chuck




Neil Christopher Landsberg Jan.13th 1980 - May 9th 2013
Neil Christopher Landsberg of Frederick, Maryland, passed away May 9, 2013. Born January 13, 1980 in Wichita, Kansas, he attended Thomas Johnson High School, Frederick, MD and Valley Forge Military Academy in PA. He graduated from the Citadel, Charleston, SC served with distinction as a Captain in USAF Special Operations receiving the Air Force Commendation Medal, Air Force Achievement Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, and Global War on Terrorism Service Medal.

Neil was an avid athlete who loved sailing, windsurfing, bicycling, swimming, the outdoors, animals and his friends. He volunteered for Habitat for Humanity, Team Rubicon and assisted regularly at Walter Reed Medical Center helping wounded combat veterans adjust to a new life.

He will be remembered lovingly by his parents Jan & Bruce Landsberg, brother Matthew, aunts and uncles: Sherri and Lee Earman, Karen & Fletcher Burns, Christopher and Louise Dutton, Charolette, grand- mother Fran, cousins Steve, Sam, Alex and many friends.

A celebration of life will be held at a later date.  Online condolences may be shared at keeneybasford.com.   Contributions may be sent to specialops.org or teamrubiconusa.org.

Pictured; Self, Jeremy Fresques (KIA), ?, Derek Argel (KIA), Neil Landsberg (Self Inflicted, PTSD), and ?   This picture was taken at the 50th CCT Anniversary Reunion.  Three of these 6 Special Tactics Officers are dead because of the war.  Neil was on Advance Skills Training Team 10, with Casey Crate (KIA) and Adam Servais (KIA) making this world even smaller.   This also reminds us the war is not over, just because you made it back.


Arlington National Cemetery, 12-04-2013, Neil is interred and During Taps, Marine 1 flew over....perfect timing.

Meet my brother, Neil Landsberg. Neil was motivated and accomplished from an early age. He graduated high school at Valley Forge Military Academy in 1998 and graduated from the Citadel Military College in 2002. After the Citadel, he began his career in the Air Force and earned a very selective position as an officer in the elite Combat Control special operations.  While a Combat Controller, he deployed multiple times to Iraq, Afghanistan, and the horn of Africa. During nearly each deployment, one or more members of his team died or were severely wounded.  After Neil left the military, he attained a Top Secret clearance and worked for a defense contractor, where he trained special operators and CIA agents. He spent free time volunteering at Walter Reed for Sentinel’s of Freedom (to help those with severe injuries), Habitat for Humanity, and Team Rubicon. He loved all watersports, cycling, animals, and his friends and family.

PTS and Survivor’s Guilt…
 
After Neil separated from the military, he successfully hid the symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress (note: we don’t consider it a disorder, it’s an injury… a byproduct of environment and exposure – calling it a disorder perpetuates the stigma).  He might have shown subtle signs, but his friends, family, and employer, weren’t aware of the specific symptoms. Only until the trauma became acute and Neil was in crisis, did he ask for help. He was extremely anxious and acting unusual when he said to me, “Matt, I think I need to be checked in somewhere. I’m feeling suicidal.” I was concerned, but I knew he was safe with me. I didn’t make a big deal of it, I just drove him to what I thought was a reputable area hospital.
At the hospital, the psychiatrist, without taking into account his combat tours, survivor’s guilt, or current line of work, misdiagnosed Neil, labeled him, and prescribed him medication. The attending physician showed no compassion, offered no hope for recovery, and it’s our opinion that Neil would have been better off somewhere else. The doctor ordered him to stay at the hospital where he was observed (but not treated or cared for). We tried to get him transferred to a Veteran’s Affairs (VA) hospital so he could be with people that understood his background, but were denied.  After a week at the hospital, we knew he wasn’t much better, but we trusted the hospital and physician’s decision to release him…they’re supposed to know about mental health…
 
Once Neil was released, we tried to get him more care at a VA Hospital. Despite his time in the service, the VA didn’t have his medical records – he was told it would take three weeks to admit him. Despite my mom’s attempt to drive his medical records to the closest VA location that day, they still insisted it would take three weeks. Sadly, a few days later, after spending a week in a hospital and not feeling better, he lost hope that any professional would be able to help him. He took his own life May 9th, 2013.
 
A few weeks after Neil died, we received a form letter from the VA stating that Neil didn’t qualify for help because his income was too high. Even if he were in the VA system, the professionals most capable of helping Neil, would never get the chance.
It Can Happen to Anyone…

Neil was one of the most capable and strongest people I knew – both physically and mentally. His military college and years of Special Operations training hardened him into a warrior with incredible mental and emotional fortitude. He was trained “to do” and to overcome – not “to ask” for help. Knowing Neil’s pedigree, his personality, and his character, I’m absolutely certain that if Neil can succumb to PTS and survivor’s guilt, and feel hopeless after receiving NO help in a civilian hospital, anyone can.  And just like heart disease or cancer, after certain conditions and exposures, the symptoms and manifestation of PTS and survivor’s guilt can happen to anyone!

Next Mission…
 
The pain of Neil’s sudden death is with me everyday… I always miss him and will miss sharing life experiences with him. He was a remarkable brother and friend. Unfortunately, we can’t change what happened to Neil, we can only look forward, prevent unnecessary tragedy, and turn this into something positive. We can take Neil’s story and the many, many thousands like him, and make changes within the system so no other veteran falls within the cracks of the DoD, VA, and civilian hospital system (among others). We should collectively provide ample support, therapy, and education so Warrior’s don’t need to ask for help – it will be available and readily exist… when they least think they’ll need it.
We should verify that best practices and procedures are in place to greatly reduce the number of veterans that reach the crisis/acute need stage. We should address the threats to mental health early so no one endures this unnecessary end. Neil’s mission will continue, in a different capacity, to help some of the people he cared for most – his fellow service members. I believe it’s our moral obligation to fight for those that have fought for us. Join the coalition to end Veteran Suicide and work with us to protect one of our most valuable resources – our selfless veterans…help end veteran suicide.
 
With appreciation........................ Matt Landsberg





Kay B. Duncan, passed away Friday, April 12 2013


Kay B Duncan, Dads service will be on Wednesday the 17th @ 2PM we will start to receive guest @ 1PM at BULLOCK FUNERAL HOME 1190 Wilson Hall Rd Sumter, SC 29150 (803) 469-3400 www.bullockfuneralhome.com If you would like to say a few words or have something read out loud please contact BULLOCK FUNERAL HOME

Retired U.S.  Air Force MSgt Combat Controller Kay Brill Duncan Sr., 77, passed away Friday, April 12 2013 at Toumey Medical Center in Sumter after a courageous battle with several ailments. Born September 18, 1935 in Charlotte, NC., he was the son of the late Wade Hampton Duncan and Tempie Lanier Duncan of Whiteville N.C. His family and friends lovingly knew him as K.B. He was preceded in death by his beloved wife of 34 years, Terasita Julie Ricafort Duncan. Surviving are two daughters, Ann Duncan Heredia (Greg) of Fairfield, CA. and Karen Duncan Page (Kelvin) of Sumter, SC; two sons Kay B Duncan Jr. (Julie) of Pelion, SC and Terry Hampton Duncan of Sumter, SC; 8 grandchildren and 8 great grandchildren. 

K.B. served 27 years in the armed services. He joined the Army when he was 17 and served 3 years. He later joined the Army National Guard before he found his home in the Air Force. He toured in Korea, Vietnam and the Philippines as well as several other duty stations both abroad and in the US. He was one of the early members of the elite United States Air Force Combat Control Team where he formed a strong bond and brother hood with his fellow beloved Combat Controllers. He was a recipient of many decorations and medals that included the Air Force Commendation Medal, the Air Medal, and the Bronze Star for acts of heroism. K.B. retired from the Air Force in 1979 at the rank of Master Sergeant. He went on to graduate from Horry-Georgetown Technical College with a degree in Hotel, Motel, and Restaurant Management. He retired a second time from US Airways after working in New York’s LaGuardia Airport, then Cleveland Hopkins International Airport and finally Charlotte Douglas International Airport as a ticket agent. After twice retiring, he and his wife, Julie, started their business in Myrtle Beach, The Ice Cream Machine that gave them great pleasure.I love Dad you have always been my hero...................... Terry Duncan                           Click here to watch the Memorial Service



My Teammate, Bob Miller, R.I.P.

Robert Wayne “Bob” Miller. Born Nov. 16, 1945, passed away March 31, 2013. Bob served 22 years in the U.S. Air Force. He retired from the Pueblo County Sheriff’s Department. A remembrance will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday, April 6, 2013, at Steel City Dogs, 1131 E. Orman Ave., Pueblo, CO 81004. Please RSVP to 719-924-2816. Bob touched so many lives and will be forever loved and missed.


Pictured; Ray Long, Bob Miller, and Mike McReynolds









There are men who have a determination of spirit that transcends the aspirations of most. These men answer a call, which comes deep from within the essence of their own convictions.

They share a kindred amongst themselves and though never spoken, its' strength exceeds the power of any outside ideals forced upon it.

The sacrifices made from their ranks are great, and each loss falls hard among those who remain. Yet they continue, knowing each time they step into the sun, the rays that penetrate their souls are the voices of their comrades leading them on to the next adventure.

                                                                                                                                                     Coke Braxton

Names are but a catalyst to bring forth our memories of that person and our memories are what keep that person fresh in our hearts.   I have a few more names to pass on to you and as your memories of that person flood into your heart, you'll enjoy a smile on your face and the happiness of visiting a lost friend;

Charles Abee,Clark Alberty, Allen Alva, Ransom Andrews, William Andrews, Frank Anthony, Bob Annis, Frank Anthony, Derek Argel, William D. Armour, Richard Arnold, Nick Athans, Dave Atkinson, Ray Ayers, Jim Bach, Dick Baker, Cecil Balcom, Charlie Ballard, Ty C. Barnes, Wayne L. Barnett, Ervin J. Baumgarten, Marcus L. Baxley, Ray J. Belcher, Tom Belton, Jerry Bennett, Clarence Benoit, Jim Bezonia, Dick Bisball, Paul Bisnet, Bob Bjornstad, Harry Black, Glen Bloomer, Peter G. Bonazoli, , Bob Booth, Calvin Bosarge, Tommy Botts, Joe Boyland, Lew Brabham, J. C. Bradshaw, Bob Branum, Dick Brawley, Stan Braxton, Wayne Brewer, Drummond Brown, Lawrence Buening, Jeremiah Burke, Steve Busby, Bill Bush, Dick Callahan, Donald "Mike" Callahan, Joe Callina, Billy Campbell, Norm Campbell, Donald M. Carlyle, Ralph Carroll, Ray Carroll, Bill Carsey, John Chalk, John Chapman, Bob Chavez, Bob Cheffins, Larry Choate, Eddy Clark, Joe Clark, Ray Coleman, Steve Collette, Charlie Condict, Mark Conlin, Chuck Corey, Larry Courtroul, Pete Cox,  Albert Craft, Casey Crate, Noah Crocker, James Cuyler, Dion Daugherty, Calvin Davis, Jan Davis, Logan Davis, Timithy P. Davis, Danny Deaver, Norwood Denning, Billy Dennison, Zeke Dewey, Jim Dial, Mike Dionne, Travis Dixon, Kay B. Duncan, Vadis Doris, Charlie Drew, Tom Drinkwater, Dave Driscoll, Harold Eaves, Doug Eccleston, Lemuel Egleston, LaMar Eikman, Ray Ekenstam, John England, Bob Engleman, Burgess Everson, Rex Evitts, David Fagan, Guy T. (Tom) Fagan, David Farmer, Warren Fisk, Calvin Florian, Stefan Folenta, Bob Ford, Frank Fording, Mark Forester, Harold Foster, Paul Foster, Dick Foxx, James T. Franc, Mort Freedman, Harold Freeman, Jeremy Fresques, Henry Fuller, John Fuller, John Gaa, Ron Gale, Art Galvan, Wayne Gardner, Jerry Gauthier, John Gavlick, Norris Gentry, George Genung, Jackie Gilmer, Scott "Jewels" Giuliani, Roy Givens, Gerald Glass, Jon Goerling, Alfred Gordy, Dennis Gordy, Everette Graham, George Gray, Leroy Green,  Rod Gress, Lavern J. Guggenmos , Andre Guillet, Walter R. Guyle, Dick Hall, Johnny Hall, William T. Hall, George Hamblin, Jackie Hardin, Herbert Harney, Gary Harper, Andy Harvell, Paul Heffron, Bobby Helton, Lyle Hendricks, Joe Hendricks, Dave Henry, Billy Henson, Bill Herdliska, Everett Herron, Larry Hicks, George Higby, Terry Highland, Robert Hill, Jim Hilliard, Jim Hiser, Ron Holder, Allen Hooper, Gary Hooper, Gene Hoover, Sean Hopkins, Steve Hopwood, Art Howard, Clyde Howard, Don Howie, Lundie Hudgin, Bobby Hudson, Dave Hughes, Derek Hughes, Jim Hughes, Alan Hutchinson, Bobby James, John Jacoby, Alvin Janke, William Jefferson, Dale"Critter" Jensen, Bill Jerkins, Barnard Johnson, Bruce Johnson, William Johnson, Keith Jolly, Charlie Jones, Hosea Jones, John Juergensen, Richard Karmann, John Karr, Jim Kauffman, Ralph Kelly, Tom Kelsh, Sidney Kidwell, Walt Kilby, Ed Kimble, Dennis King, Ernest King, Monte Kirkpatrick, Joe Klauser, Jim Klyce, J.P. Lagerloef, Bill Lake, Howard Land, Neil Landsberg, Tom Laney, Bob Lanier, Cliff Larimer, Moe Lattimore, Joel Launer, Rondal Lavall, Harry Lawson, Joel Leavell, Marc Lee, Bob Lee, John Lewis,  L.V. Lewis, Don Linden, Mike "Mousy" Lisk, Ray Litz, Floyd Loveland, Larry Lower, Charles D. Luckhurst, Lonnie Lynch, Derek Lyske, George MacLean, Joe Mahurin, Ed Marion, Emillio Martinez, Louis Martinez, Chris Matero, Fred Matthews, Dave Mayer, Eugene McCarthy, Ken McCarthy, Jack McConnell, Dave McCracken, James B. McElvian, Jim McGonigal, Mark McQuiston, Dan Meyer, Jerry Miedrich, Dimitrie Milinovich, Bob Miller, Donnie Mirabile, Virgil Mitchell, Jim Mobley, Tom Monley, Eugene Montalbano, Julius Moore, Noel Moore, Jon Moorman, Harry Morgan, Vernon Morgan, Richard Myers, Mike Nazionale, Dewitt Neal Jr., Pete Neal, John Nightingale, Troy Norris, John Norsworthy, Marty North, Brad Norton, Francis E. Nugent Jr., Fred Oates, Ed Odom, Joe Orr, Dale Osborn, Jethro Owens, Bill Pack, Ernest Padillia, Danny Page, John Paivanas, Chuck Paradise, Bill Patterson, Steve Patterson, Dick Patton, Bob Pechtold, Jim Phillips, Joe Phillips, Jim Philpot, Danny Pike, Maurice Pittman, Bill Polston, Jim Proctor, Delta Prosser, Frank Pumphrey, Scott Queen, Jerry Quintus, Larry Rainey, Encarnation Ramos, Jim Ray, Steve Ray, Bob Revland, Gus Rhinehart, Ed Rhodes, Everett Robbins, Outlaw Robbins, Paul Roberts, Lonnie Robinson, Juan E. Rodriguez, Pat Rogers, Joe Rountree, Ray Rubel, Luis Salgado, Gary Samdal, Danny Sanchez, Tom Sanders, Scott Sather, Henry Schaeffer, Mark Scholl, Roger Schuh, John Semple, Adam Servais,  Lester Shaw, Bob Shea, John Sheptak, William Shortt, Dick Sigman, Colvin Singleton,  Don Smith, Pete Smith, Ernest Solomon, Panuk Soomsawasdi, Dwight Spargur, David Srnka, James Stanford, J. D. Steagald, Bill Stevens, Tom Stone, Franklin Strange, John V. Stryker, Allan Sundlie, Sunny Sutton,  William L. Swope, Michael T. Takach Jr., John Taft, Leonard Thomas, Jim Thompson, Jerry Thompson, Richard Thompson, Fred Thrower, Tony Tino, Terrance Todd, Sidney Toups, Bryan Towle, Martin Tracy, Robert C. "Bob" Triplett, George Tummolo, John Underwood, Vic Valle, Glenn Vanderkamp, John VanLund, Wayne Viars, Clyde Wales, John Watts,  John (Jack) "Spider" Webb, Eric Webster, Skip Weiss, Bob Werkmeister, Monkey West, Joe Willard, Leo Whiticar, Bob Whitney, Rick "Whip" Wilson, Otis Winn, Frank Woodring, Ken Young, and Greg Zelinko

CCT, THEY NEVER SAY GOODBYE

They are one. Each a part of the other.
They never say goodbye.
They always say, I will see you later.
They meet upon a training field. They meet upon a battlefield.
They meet in the sea and the sky. They meet back at the Team.
They meet upon the street or reunion.
Yet they never say goodbye.
They always say, I will see you later.
Even though they are a thousand miles from each other.
They are always only a thought away.
They never say goodbye.
They always say, I will see you later.
They may pass from our sight. They may pass from this world.
Yet they always see each other…….Everyday.
They have shared their sweat, their tears, their pains, their heartaches, their stories,
Their love, their joy and each other.
They are one. They are brothers.
Never far away.
They never say Goodbye.
They always say, I will see you later.

                                                                                                                                   By; Randy D. Schlotman                                                                                                                                       Combat Controller


http://www.CCTMemorial.com


May They Rest In Peace, And Never Be Forgotten!

Life is just a stepping stone along the path to eternity………Mac